Here are some noteworthy cleantech announcements of the day from around the world:

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s latest construction cost data revealed that the average construction cost for onshore wind generators fell from $1,895/kW in 2013 to $1,391/kW in 2019. The U.S. offshore wind generating capacity increased 74% from 2013 to 2019 to a total of 104 GW, including 9.6 GW built in 2019. Average onshore wind construction costs in 2019 for Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), Southwest Power Pool (SPP), and Midcontinent Independent System Operator (MISO) were $1,114/kW, $1,426/kW, and $1,637/kW, respectively. Average construction costs in both SPP and MISO were above the U.S. average in 2019. ERCOT installed the most wind capacity of any U.S. electricity market region in 2019 of 3.5 GW and had a total wind capacity of 26 GW as of December 2019. California had relatively high average wind plant construction costs, averaging $2,310/kW for new wind installations between 2013 and 2019.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, inaugurated the 300 MW first stage of the 900 MW fifth phase of the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park. Implemented by Dubai Electricity and Water Authority using the Independent Power Producer model, the solar park has a planned total capacity of 5 GW by 2030. The Solar Park’s projects will supplement Dubai’s Clean Energy Strategy 2050, aiming to provide 75% of its total power capacity from clean energy sources by 2050. The fifth phase investments amount to AED 2.058 billion (~$560 million).

Solar module manufacturer JinkoSolar Holding, through its 100% subsidiary Jinko Solar, inked a deal with Munich-based chemical company Wacker Chemie AG to procure over 70,000 tons of polysilicon. Under the terms of the agreement, Wacker will supply the polysilicon to Jinko Solar from September 2021 to December 2026. Wacker will reserve the agreed capacity to Jinko Solar and supply polysilicon from its production sites in Germany and the United States. The purchase price will be decided based on the market price.


Germany-based fuel cells supplier SFC Energy AG and Norway-based electrolyzer manufacturer Nel ASA have agreed to develop an integrated electrolyzer and hydrogen fuel cell system for decentralized energy generation and storage.  The partnership will focus on developing industrial solutions to replace less efficient diesel generators. As a first step, the partnership addresses applications in a power range up to 50 kW, will be extended up to 500 kW in the medium term. The parties plan to launch the first products in the second half of 2022.

Sweden-based energy storage company Azelio received a conditional order from Egypt-based Engazaat Development for 20 of Azelio’s TES.POD® renewable energy storage units. Azelio’s TES.POD® is a long-duration energy storage system that stores renewable energy in recycled aluminum. It supplies electricity and heat on demand around the clock. The 20 units have a combined storage capacity of 3.3 MWh of electricity production. They will be part of a mini-grid system to supply farmers with renewable energy. The order is valued at approximately $1.5 million and is estimated to be delivered in December 2021.